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Ongoing Research Projects supported by Research IT

Listing of project codes and abstracts, describing work undertaken which use the resources of the compute clusters hosted by the Research IT team.

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Showing 10 of 378 Results
Project Title AMBBN
Project Code HPC_18_01016
Principal Investigator Assistant Professor Edmund Lalor
Start Date 2018-02-01
End Date 2018-12-21
Abstract Objective analysis of the human auditory system using a linear least squares system identification approach.
Project Title AMBBN
Project Code HPC_18_01015
Principal Investigator Assistant Professor Edmund Lalor
Start Date 2018-01-29
End Date 2018-02-28
Abstract Objective analysis of the human auditory system using a linear least squares system identification approach.
Project Title FERROVOLT
Project Code HPC_17_01010
Principal Investigator Prof Stefano Sanvito
Start Date 2017-12-20
End Date 2018-09-30
Abstract For a better understanding and design of ferroelectric photovoltaics: First-principles study of optical absorption and charge-carrier transport at ferroelectric domain walls in BiFeO3 The goal of this project is to help find the rules for a domain-wall engineering that optimizes photovoltaic efficiency of potential future-generation ferroelectric solar cells. The material to be studied is BiFeO3 as the most promising photovoltaic ferroelectric material known. Does the photovoltaic effect in BiFeO3 occur at the domain walls or in the bulk? What does it take a domain-wall to conduct electrons? The project aims at establishing the necessary conditions for electric fields and electrical conductivity at ferroelectric domain walls. Since experimental evidence is inconclusive, state-of-the-art ab initio methods will be applied. Electric fields have a long spatial range, so we will go beyond the standard supercell approach to obtain the spatial gradient of the band structure at the domain wall, needed to obtain charge-carrier distributions and electric fields. The Green's-function method for electronic quantum transport will be used for this purpose because it is suitable for extended, non-periodic systems. We will obtain the electrical conductivity as a function of the domain-wall type, structure, and purity. Conclusions for the role of the domain walls in BiFeO3 will be generalized as far as possible in order to apply them to other ferroelectric semiconductors as well. The project is positioned where fundamental condensed-matter physics meets applied solar-cell research. It is expected to advance the frontier of knowledge in basic research and to lay the ground for further research on ferroelectric photovoltaics. It is a contribution to the efforts of the European Union to develop innovative solutions for a sustainable energy supply that help achieve independence of fossil energy. In addition, high-throughput screening and computational characterization for promising photovoltaic absorber materials is planned, including, but maybe not limited to, perovskites and related compounds.
Project Title Electrophysiological correlates underlying reward processing in young adults
Project Code HPC_17_01009
Principal Investigator Dr Robert Whelan
Start Date 2017-12-20
End Date 2018-01-18
Abstract The EEG technique can provide us with neural information of high time resolution (de Haan & Thomas, 2002), which is particularly useful for the detection of brain rapid evaluations of the outcomes and makes EEG studies on reward processing be complementary sources to fMRI findings. The eMID task have been widely used in different areas from basic studies on reward processing to clinical research using drug addicts and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)(Chronaki, Soltesz, Benikos, & Sonuga-Barke, 2017; Meadows, Gable, Lohse, & Miller, 2016; Pornpattananangkul & Nusslock, 2015; Trimber & Luhmann, 2017; Vignapiano et al., 2016; Yang et al., 2015). The aim of the study is to identify ERP components and brain oscillations that associate with reward processing, which could be further used in future reward processing endophenotype studies
Project Title Pseudopotential test
Project Code HPC_17_01008
Principal Investigator Prof Stefano Sanvito
Start Date 2017-12-08
End Date 2019-09-30
Abstract In the context of Density Functional Theory (DFT) it is common use to employ Pseudopotentials in order to reduce the computational load of the calculations. We are developing a new version of Pseudopotentials that includes the so called Self Interaction Correction. First step for the test is to perform super-converged calculations on crystal elements structures using the code Quantum Espresso.
Project Title Finding Metastable Magnets
Project Code HPC_17_01007
Principal Investigator Prof Stefano Sanvito
Start Date 2017-11-29
End Date 2018-05-31
Abstract In Physics it is not always the most energetically favourable structure the one that forms. In fact, there are many situations in which together with the most stable structure many others also exist. These are called metastable. For example, diamond is a metastable form of carbon at standard temperature and pressure, with graphene being the most stable one. Thus, at least in principle, all diamonds will eventually turn into graphite. In practice, however, such metastable structures take extremely long times to be converted into their thermodynamically stable counterparts, so that to all purposes they can be considered as stable. There are even several examples, where only metastable structures are found in nature, simply because the most stable one is not accessible during the growth process. Since the minimum energy criterion does not apply any longer, predicting the existence of metastable structures is a complicate task. In this project we will explore possible high-throughput [1] ways to predict metastable structures for metallic and magnetic alloys. In particular we will try to identify random metallic alloys, which can sustain a magnetic ground state. The tools for the investigation will be advanced electronic structure theory, in the form or density functional theory, and a statistical analysis of the possible alloy configurations. We will focus on a specific class of materials known as Heusler alloys [2], which contains a large number of known members, with many presenting a large degree of disorder. We will evaluate whether known compounds do exist because of their low energy or because of their high entropy, and estimate the probability to find new ones. If new promising compounds are identified, there will be the possibility to grow them in Prof. Coey’s lab. In particular the student will: 1. Learn how to use a density functional theory code to calculate the electronic " " structure of materials 2. Run calculations for random Heusler alloys 3. Perform a statistical analysis of the results and establish stability rules
Project Title Metastablity for magnets
Project Code HPC_17_01006
Principal Investigator Prof Stefano Sanvito
Start Date 2017-11-29
End Date 2018-11-28
Abstract In Physics it is not always the most energetically favourable structure the one that forms. In fact, there are many situations in which together with the most stable structure many others also exist. These are called metastable. For example, diamond is a metastable form of carbon at standard temperature and pressure, with graphene being the most stable one. Thus, at least in principle, all diamonds will eventually turn into graphite. In practice, however, such metastable structures take extremely long times to be converted into their thermodynamically stable counterparts, so that to all purposes they can be considered as stable. There are even several examples, where only metastable structures are found in nature, simply because the most stable one is not accessible during the growth process. Since the minimum energy criterion does not apply any longer, predicting the existence of metastable structures is a complicate task. In this project we will explore possible high-throughput ways to predict metastable structures for metallic and magnetic alloys. In particular we will try to identify random metallic alloys, which can sustain a magnetic ground state. The tools for the investigation will be advanced electronic structure theory, in the form or density functional theory, and a statistical analysis of the possible alloy configurations. We will focus on a specific class of materials known as Heusler alloys, which contains a large number of known members, with many presenting a large degree of disorder. We will evaluate whether known compounds do exist because of their low energy or because of their high entropy, and estimate the probability to find new ones.
Project Title Amidine-like derivatives targeting the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway
Project Code HPC_17_01005
Principal Investigator Prof Isabel Rozas
Start Date 2017-10-01
End Date 2021-09-30
Abstract About 30% of human tumours are caused by the Ras oncogene and its signalling cascade (MAPK kinase pathway: involving the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK kinases), which cause uncontrolled cell division and growth, proliferation, and evasion of apoptosis. Particularly, finding mutationally activated BRaf in several cancers has changed the understanding of the role of the Raf kinases in oncogenesis. BRaf mutations are common in melanoma but BRaf point mutations also occur in thyroid (60%), colorectal (10%) and lung (6%) cancers, many of which are insensitive to current BRaf inhibitors. Thus, inhibiting the MAPK pathway is an attractive approach for chemotherapeutic agents. Rozas’ group has previously developed a series of guanidine containing derivatives with similarity to known kinase inhibitors, which inhibit 96-99% the Raf/MEK pathway. Additionally, cell-viability and apoptosis studies showed positive results in several cancer cell lines and further biological assays suggested that these compounds are type- III (allosteric) BRaf inhibitors. In a targeted therapy approach, in this project we aim to develop more selective anticancer therapeutics by targeting the MAPK kinases pathway and will explore the biochemical implications of this pathway disruption by: (i) designing, using computational molecular modelling techniques, the suitability of the compounds proposed as BRaf inhibitors by means of docking experiments with an ATP-containing BRaf model developed by Rozas’ group; (ii) synthesise the most promising compounds indicated by the computational study as non-ATP-competitive BRaf inhibitors, making use of Rozas’ standard synthetic approaches and new optimized methodologies; (iii) biochemically study their cytotoxicity, by means of in vitro cell viability assays, in a number of cancer cell lines (leukemia: HL-60, breast cancer: MCF-7, colorectal cancer: RKO-T29, cervical cancer: HeLa, neuroblastoma: Kelly) and potential to induce apoptosis; and (iv) assess the inhibitory potential of these compounds in the MAPK pathway
Project Title Derivatives of guanidine-based DNA minor groove binders as antiprotozoal agents
Project Code HPC_17_01004
Principal Investigator Prof Isabel Rozas
Start Date 2017-10-01
End Date 2021-10-01
Abstract According to the World-Health-Organization (WHO), in 2015 there were 207-million cases of malaria and 627,000 deaths and 7,216 cases of sleeping-sickness were recorded. Still no definitive cure has been found for parasitic diseases due to the emergence of resistance to the drugs used. Therefore, it is highly important to find new cures for these conditions that affect a large number of people in the world. Considering the good results previously obtained by Rozas' group for a series of aminoalkyl derivatives of guanidine DNA minor groove binders as antimalarial agents, and taking into account that two possible mechanism of action could be behind this activity (i.e. binding to the DNA minor groove or inhibition of the dihydrofolate reductase thymidine synthetase of the parasite –DHFR-TS-), we propose to prepare new analogues to improve and better understand such antiprotozoal activity. This optimization phase will include several steps: i) computational modelling of the interaction of the proposed molecules with the minor groove of DNA and with the active site of DHFR-TS; ii) synthesis of the most promising compounds as informed by the computational study and following synthetic pathways known in Rozas’ laboratory; iii) study of the affinity of the compounds prepared towards DNA by means of biophysical experiments; and iv) biological evaluation of the antiprotozoan effect of these compounds in several parasites such as those causing malaria or sleeping sickness as well as of the potential inhibition of the DHFR-TS of the malaria parasite. In addition, the teratogenic properties of these compounds will be assessed. In the long-term, if the compounds prepared show the activity we are aiming for, this research could benefit people in less developed countries who suffer from parasitic infections such as malaria.
Project Title QoS optimisation for IoT Service Composition
Project Code HPC_17_01003
Principal Investigator Professor Siobhan Clarke
Start Date 2017-11-13
End Date 2018-09-01
Abstract IoT services have a number of QoS attributes that are constantly changing. When used in a composed service, the QoS needs to be continuously optimised to account for the variability in resources.